Sunday, May 22, 2011

Tiny

[caption id="attachment_1311" align="aligncenter" width="420" caption="Photo Courtesy of http://ma.tt"][/caption]

Tommy looked at all the assorted ornaments on his grandmother's bookshelf. Many were made of wood and resembled birds and other animals. Something caught his attention, and he noticed one of the ornaments, a colorful little moth, was flapping its wings. It flew in the area and traveled the path of a circle before landing again in the spot it ascended from and remained still.

"Mommy," Tommy called. "Look. The moth flew in the air."

"That's nice, dear," His mother said and then continued talking to Tommy's grandmother.

"No really. It flew." Tommy, only six, didn't like that his mother just said things without paying attention. It made him feel like she didn't care.

He took a look at the moth again, and the same thing happened. It went up into the air, flew in a circle, and landed.

"There. It did it again!" Tommy exclaimed.

"Tommy, be quiet. I'm trying to talk to you grandmother," his mother snapped.

"But it did," he tried to explain but his mother was ignoring him at this point. It made him feel small and unwanted.

Then, Tommy watched as the moth once again flapped it's wings, flew into the air, and now, instead of flying in a circle and landing, it flew right out the window and didn't return.

"It's gone! It's gone! It flew outside," Tommy said trying to get his mother's attention.

"Nonsense, Tommy. Now stop it. Just go play and do something." His mother sounded very angry.

"No. Really. Look. It's not on the shelf anymore." Tommy pointed to the place on the shelf where the moth ornament had been to show it wasn't there.

"Oh my," his grandmother said. "Where did it go?"

"Tommy, where did you put the ornament," his mother said accusingly. "Put it back now."

"I told you, if flew out the window," he said, although he could tell his mother didn't believe him.

"Tommy," she said, drawing it out as if asking him to put it back immediately.

"Really. It flew out the window."

"Fine. You want to play it that way," she said as she walked over and grabbed him by the arm and pulled him toward a chair in the room, "then you can sit in a time-out in this chair until you tell me where the moth ornament is."

Tommy sat on the chair a long time. At first he cried, but after a while he just sat there. Over time, his mother forgot she even put him in the time-out and he got off the chair and started flapping his arms, pretending he was that tiny moth that flew out the window.